National

Question time in federal parliament

By AAP Newswire

WHAT WE LEARNED

* Question time began with recognition of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.

* The US ambassador to Australia, Arthur Culvahouse, was in the House chamber for question time.

* 2.9 million Australians have lodged their tax returns, up 460,000 on the same time last year.

* Labor wants a departmental inquiry into former ministers Christopher Pyne and Julie Bishop's post-parliament roles reopened.

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WHAT THE GOVERNMENT WANTED TO SPIN

Why won't the opposition support the government's drought support plan and anti-terrorism laws

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WHAT LABOR WANTED TO TALK ABOUT

Why is the government unnecessarily politicising national security and support for farmers

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WHAT THEY SAID

"Does the prime minister doubt which side people are on when they support the unanimous position of the parliamentary joint committee on intelligence and security?" - Labor leader Anthony Albanese.

"What I have noted in my time in this place is that it has always been those who sit on this side of the house have always brought the stronger position." - Prime Minister Scott Morrison on national security.

"There's no change to the government's policy." - Morrison, asked whether he would dump the rise in the superannuation guarantee.

"The leader of the opposition is opposition with a capital 'O'." - Morrison on Albanese.

"The integrity of this government is linked to the observance and enforcement of ministerial standards ... unanswered questions remain." - Labor's Tony Burke on an internal inquiry which cleared Julie Bishop and Christopher Pyne.